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dailybunny:

Bunny Celebrates His Eleventh Birthday with a Garden Planted in His Favorite Chewable Basket
Happy Bunday! Thanks, Jane, Gillian, Stuart and bunny Pepe!

dailybunny:

Bunny Celebrates His Eleventh Birthday with a Garden Planted in His Favorite Chewable Basket

Happy Bunday! Thanks, Jane, Gillian, Stuart and bunny Pepe!

neaq:

Like father like son?

The biggest dad at the Aquarium has to be Isaac. Take Dad to see our hefty fur seal father and his (growing) baby, Flaherty, on exhibit at the marine mammal center!

tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1855-95, [carte de visite portrait of a man in academic gown], Charles Lake Cramer
via the Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Carl Mautz Collection

tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1855-95, [carte de visite portrait of a man in academic gown], Charles Lake Cramer

via the Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Carl Mautz Collection

cnce:

Smart machines probably won’t kill us all—but they’ll definitely take our jobs, and sooner than you think. Read Kevin Drum’s latest, from the magazine.
via motherjones Illustration by Roberto Parada

cnce:

Smart machines probably won’t kill us all—but they’ll definitely take our jobs, and sooner than you think. Read Kevin Drum’s latest, from the magazine.

motherjones 

funnyordie:

12 Examples of Gatsby-Inspired Product Promotion Getting out of Hand
Fashion, drinks, cars: The Great Gatsby is a marketing gold mine. These products pulled from the film’s era are bound to spark a revival.

funnyordie:

12 Examples of Gatsby-Inspired Product Promotion Getting out of Hand

Fashion, drinks, cars: The Great Gatsby is a marketing gold mine. These products pulled from the film’s era are bound to spark a revival.

we-are-star-stuff:

Who says North is up?
Upside Down maps (also known as South-Up or Reversed maps) offer a completely different perspective of the world we live in.
Technically speaking, even referring to the earth with words like “up” or “down” or comparing places with words “above” or “below” is flawed, considering that the earth is a spherical body (it’s actually slightly “fatter” at the equator) and flying through 3 dimensional space with no reference of up or down. However, the issue of “up” and “down” does become an issue when viewing the surface of the earth projected onto a flat piece of paper (a map). And the effect of the orientation of a map is more significant than you might realize.
As all maps require orientation for reference, the issue of how to layout the map orientation is as old as maps themselves. As map orientation is completely arbitrary, it is not surprising that they differed throughout time periods and regions.
The convention of North-up is usually attributed to the Egyptian astronomer Ptolemy (90-168 AD). Justifications for his north-up approach vary. In the middle ages, East was often placed at top. This is the origin of the term “The Orient” to refer to East Asia. During the age of exploration, European cartographers again followed the north-up convention…perhaps because the North Star was their fixed reference point for navigation, or because they wanted (subconsciously or otherwise) to ensure Europe’s claim at the top of the world.
In modern times, reversed maps are made as a learning device or to illustrate Northern Hemisphere bias. Different from simply turning a north-up map upside down, a reversed map has the text oriented to be read with south up.
The famous “Blue Marble” photograph of the Earth taken from on board Apollo 17 was originally oriented with the south pole at the top, with the island of Madagascar visible just left of center, and the continent of Africa at its right. However, the image was turned upside-down to fit the traditional view.
While the orientation of a map might seem harmless, it can have a significant effect on one’s perception of the world, and the relative importance of the different place in it.
In speech, we often refer to places being “above” or “below” others. Think of how you would say you’re about to travel to the state or country to your north or south (to go “down” to Kentucky from Indiana, or “up” to Canada from the US). Without even mentioning geography, ask any grade school student whether Mexico is “above” or “below” the United States. We’re all familiar with the “land down under”. As we often correlate importance to relative height (think how a citizens of a country will fly their flag higher than all other flags), the north-up convention reinforces the idea that northern bodies are more important than their southern neighbors. Suddenly, traveling “down” to the South might have an inference much deeper than geographic location.
After looking at the map more closely, you may realize that the South-Up orientation may change your perception of the relative status of different places. For example, South America suddenly looks to have more prominence, and Africa and the Middle East completely dwarf Europe. Likewise, tucking Northern Europe, Canada, and Russia away at the bottom of the map, subconsciously takes away their status.
To summarize, unconditionally accepting the north-up map convention without at least appreciating the effect stands at odds with viewing all people and places within the world equally. x x

we-are-star-stuff:

Who says North is up?

Upside Down maps (also known as South-Up or Reversed maps) offer a completely different perspective of the world we live in.

Technically speaking, even referring to the earth with words like “up” or “down” or comparing places with words “above” or “below” is flawed, considering that the earth is a spherical body (it’s actually slightly “fatter” at the equator) and flying through 3 dimensional space with no reference of up or down. However, the issue of “up” and “down” does become an issue when viewing the surface of the earth projected onto a flat piece of paper (a map). And the effect of the orientation of a map is more significant than you might realize.

As all maps require orientation for reference, the issue of how to layout the map orientation is as old as maps themselves. As map orientation is completely arbitrary, it is not surprising that they differed throughout time periods and regions.

The convention of North-up is usually attributed to the Egyptian astronomer Ptolemy (90-168 AD). Justifications for his north-up approach vary. In the middle ages, East was often placed at top. This is the origin of the term “The Orient” to refer to East Asia. During the age of exploration, European cartographers again followed the north-up convention…perhaps because the North Star was their fixed reference point for navigation, or because they wanted (subconsciously or otherwise) to ensure Europe’s claim at the top of the world.

In modern times, reversed maps are made as a learning device or to illustrate Northern Hemisphere bias. Different from simply turning a north-up map upside down, a reversed map has the text oriented to be read with south up.

The famous “Blue Marble” photograph of the Earth taken from on board Apollo 17 was originally oriented with the south pole at the top, with the island of Madagascar visible just left of center, and the continent of Africa at its right. However, the image was turned upside-down to fit the traditional view.

While the orientation of a map might seem harmless, it can have a significant effect on one’s perception of the world, and the relative importance of the different place in it.

In speech, we often refer to places being “above” or “below” others. Think of how you would say you’re about to travel to the state or country to your north or south (to go “down” to Kentucky from Indiana, or “up” to Canada from the US). Without even mentioning geography, ask any grade school student whether Mexico is “above” or “below” the United States. We’re all familiar with the “land down under”. As we often correlate importance to relative height (think how a citizens of a country will fly their flag higher than all other flags), the north-up convention reinforces the idea that northern bodies are more important than their southern neighbors. Suddenly, traveling “down” to the South might have an inference much deeper than geographic location.

After looking at the map more closely, you may realize that the South-Up orientation may change your perception of the relative status of different places. For example, South America suddenly looks to have more prominence, and Africa and the Middle East completely dwarf Europe. Likewise, tucking Northern Europe, Canada, and Russia away at the bottom of the map, subconsciously takes away their status.

To summarize, unconditionally accepting the north-up map convention without at least appreciating the effect stands at odds with viewing all people and places within the world equally. x x

cracked:

Oh, great. Up is going to make us cry again. But this time because it cribbed from a French student film.
7 Classic Movies That Are Shameless Ripoffs



#7. Up Closely Resembles a French Short
The film Up is about a lonely old man whose house faces demolition, as it now sits squarely in the middle of a construction zone. Served with an eviction notice, the old man ties hundreds of balloons to his house and floats away.
But It’s Suspiciously Similar To …
Above Then Beyond is an animated French short about a lonely widow whose home faces demolition by evil businessmen because it’s the only house left in the middle of an urban development. The sharply dressed bastards then show up to bully her out of her house. And after being served with an eviction notice, she turns her house into a gigantic hot air balloon and floats off into the clouds.
SlashFilm did this side-by-side comparison.



Read More

cracked:

Oh, great. Up is going to make us cry again. But this time because it cribbed from a French student film.

7 Classic Movies That Are Shameless Ripoffs

#7. Up Closely Resembles a French Short

The film Up is about a lonely old man whose house faces demolition, as it now sits squarely in the middle of a construction zone. Served with an eviction notice, the old man ties hundreds of balloons to his house and floats away.

But It’s Suspiciously Similar To …

Above Then Beyond is an animated French short about a lonely widow whose home faces demolition by evil businessmen because it’s the only house left in the middle of an urban development. The sharply dressed bastards then show up to bully her out of her house. And after being served with an eviction notice, she turns her house into a gigantic hot air balloon and floats off into the clouds.

SlashFilm did this side-by-side comparison.

Read More

martinekenblog:

Beijing-based artist Huang Yan expertly emulates traditional paintings from the Song Dynasty of Chinese landscapes on the human body. While the style and art of painting is a traditional practice, the choice to use the human form as a canvas adds new meaning to the works. The contemporary artist’s series, aptly titled Chinese Landscapes, presents a visual relationship between man and nature through his expert application.

(via)

lifeofimpala:

Autumn Salad: pomegranate seeds, chives, watercress, radicchio and cos lettuce leaves with a sprinkle of coconut balsamic vinegar, pomegranate juice, olive oil and pink salt from the Murray River region of South Australia. Can’t wait to eat this post workout!! Yum

lifeofimpala:

Autumn Salad: pomegranate seeds, chives, watercress, radicchio and cos lettuce leaves with a sprinkle of coconut balsamic vinegar, pomegranate juice, olive oil and pink salt from the Murray River region of South Australia. Can’t wait to eat this post workout!! Yum

reportagebygettyimages:

The News Photographers Association of Canada interviewed Ian Willms, a Reportage Emerging Talent, about his project “As Long as the Sun Shines,” which won a judge’s special recognition in this year’s POYi.

I came into this story thinking I’d do a photo essay on rising cancer rates in towns near the Oil Sands. But it has since become much more than that. I now see this work as being about a vanishing culture and that’s tied to a vanishing environment. This situation is a continuation of a long and painful history of abuses of the First Nations within Canada.

Read more on the NPAC Web site.
Caption: Aurora borealis is seen over Fort Chipewyan’s main cemetery, September 3rd, 2011. In recent years, the cemetery has been filled beyond capacity and will soon need to be expanded.

reportagebygettyimages:

The News Photographers Association of Canada interviewed Ian Willms, a Reportage Emerging Talent, about his project “As Long as the Sun Shines,” which won a judge’s special recognition in this year’s POYi.

I came into this story thinking I’d do a photo essay on rising cancer rates in towns near the Oil Sands. But it has since become much more than that. I now see this work as being about a vanishing culture and that’s tied to a vanishing environment. This situation is a continuation of a long and painful history of abuses of the First Nations within Canada.

Read more on the NPAC Web site.

Caption: Aurora borealis is seen over Fort Chipewyan’s main cemetery, September 3rd, 2011. In recent years, the cemetery has been filled beyond capacity and will soon need to be expanded.